RM1's "friendly" and "calming" experience reported ?

Singers enjoy singing with the RM1.  They do, of course, enjoy hearing themselves on playback and on studio headphones, as one artist puts it, "sounding the way I think I sound".  Some are content to simply use a quiet ambient monitor or a "cocked headphone" and simply listen to their own singing in the air, unamplified, being confident they will hear the sound they expect on playback.

But, there are other intangibles too.  The RM1's "Megaflux" magnetic circuit design results in a lot of stray field all around the microphone, like a magnetic "aura".  Of course, no one really knows what magnetism is, but as a tribe of humans, we do know what magnetism does and how to deal with it (via magnetic design, such as used in the RM1).  Our objective analysis of magnetism is an abstraction that really does work, including committing it to dependable computer-based "FEA" (finite element analysis) software tools.  When you look at a depiction of the stray fields around the RM1's magnetic circuit (or measure them, like with a "Hall Probe"), you can clearly see or measure this halo of magnetism.  It surrounds the RM1 in all directions.

Graphical depiction of the magnetic flux field surrounding the RM1 magnetic circuit, from FEA analysis.  Field is approximately .1T or 1000 gauss in strength near the top (and bottom; the design is symmetric).

Graphical depiction of the magnetic flux field surrounding the RM1 magnetic circuit, from FEA analysis.  Field is approximately .1T or 1000 gauss in strength near the top (and bottom; the design is symmetric).

The health benefits of magnetism have made clear headway into the modern world.  Bracelets, magnetic pads and other aids are said to promote healing and general well-being.  So, this may be yet another (albeit intangible) factor that creates the feeling of well-being that RM1-users report.  Here's what WebMD.com has to say about "Magnetic Therapy":

" Magnet therapy involves applying a magnet to the skin or close to the skin to improve a condition such as pain.   The strength of magnets is described in terms of “gauss” or “Tesla.” A Tesla is equivalent to 10,000 gauss. Magnets used for treatment usually have a higher magnetic strength than typical refrigerator-type magnets. Therapeutic magnets are most often in the range of 200-10,000 gauss. Typical household magnets are typically around 200 gauss.   People wear magnets to treat painful conditions including general pain, pain after surgery, low back pain, foot pain, heel pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), carpel tunnel syndrome, painful menstrual periods, nerve pain caused by diabetes (diabetic neuropathy), sports injuries, and migraineheadache.   Magnets are also worn for treating water retention, wounds, male sexual performance problems (erectile dysfunction, ED), trouble sleeping (insomnia), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), epilepsy, trouble controlling urination (incontinence), and many other conditions.   Magnet therapy is a big business. Worldwide sales of magnets for treatment is estimated at over $5 billion annually. In the US the market is about $500 million.     How does it work?  There is interest in magnet therapy for medical conditions due to the variety of electromagnetic fields that naturally occur within the body. For example, nervous system transmissions and related muscle contractions are associated with magnetic activity. The heart generates the largest magnetic field in the body. Several other activities in the body are associated with magnetic activity.   At one time it was thought that abnormal magnetic fields in the body might result in certain disease states and that magnets could play a role in making these magnetic fields normal again.   You may hear that magnets attract the iron in red blood cells, resulting in increased circulation. But this is wrong. The iron in blood cells is not in a magnetic form. However, magnets, in theory, could have an effect on other charged molecules in the blood and other parts of the body.   There isn’t enough information to know exactly how magnets might work in the body to treat disease or pain."